Preserved Diesels in the UK

Preserved Diesels in the UK

Explores the preserved diesel locomotives of the UK.

English Electric Class 40, 50 & 55 Diesel Locomotives

The Amberley Railway Archive

English Electric Class 40, 50 & 55 Diesel Locomotives

In this superb collection of colour photographs Martin Hart records the iconic 1960s diesels built by English Electric. This is the first volume in the Amberley Railway Archive series.

British Rail Class 60 Locomotives

British Rail Class 60 Locomotives

During the mid-1980s, in a drive for greater efficiency, British Rail required another heavy freight locomotive, some of the earlier Type 5 freight locomotives being outdated and no longer regarded as suitable for heavy freight duties. The new Class 60 locomotive was to be constructed using lessons learned from the Classes 56 and 58. Six organisations were invited to tender but only three did so. The contract was awarded to Brush Electrical Machines (today, Brush Traction, part of the Wabtec Rail Group) for a powerful 60mph Type 5 Co-Co design, which resulted in an order being placed for one hundred Class 60 diesel-electric locomotives. Using original research from the National Archives, British Rail Class 60 Locomotives is a high illustrated guide that explores the commissioning of the Class 60s and their construction, testing and running. It undertakes an in-depth technical appraisal of the class and details names, liveries, modifications and preservation and includes the 'Super 60' refurbishment programme and acquisition of ten Class 60s for Colas Rail UK, bringing the timeline to the present day. Of interest to all diesel loco enthusiasts and railway modellers, thie book is lavishly illustrated with 280 colour and black & white photographs, many previously unpublished.

Preserved Railways of Eastern England

Preserved Railways of Eastern England

In this book there are seven preserved railways that can be found in the East of England. A wonderful pictorial record of the region's preserved railways.

The Changing Railways of Britain

From Steam to Diesel and Electric

The Changing Railways of Britain

As the days of steam ended, other forms of power took over...

Steam in the North West

Steam in the North West

When BR ran its 15 guinea Special in August 1968 many believed that steam locomotives would quickly become a thing of the past and that future workings would be restricted to the heritage lines which had begun to appear. Initially that seemed to be the case with the only exception being the famed A3 Class Pacific 4-6-2 Flying Scotsman whose owner had signed a contract with BR that allowed the locomotive to operate beyond that date.Change came in 1971 when BR trialled the operation of King Class 4-6-0 6000 King George V, then based at Bulmers Hereford site, on a tour of the UK which confirmed the value of steam operation as a valuable aspect of publicity which the railways of the day desperately needed. Many locomotives operating on preserved lines had been bought with the hope of being able to operate on the main line at some future date and their owners began to use this success as a lever to further ease the restriction on steam locomotive usage on the national network.Over time BR identified routes where steam traction could be operated and the centres where steam locomotives could be based as part of the new ethos. It was fitting that, as the last bastion of steam operation in 1968, the North West of England still retained its affection for steam locomotives with Carnforth locomotive depot still available as a maintenance centre. The status of steam operation was fully realised in the 1993 Railway Bill which not only privatised the network but also enshrined the right of steam locomotives to operate on the main line subject to meeting the normal operating standards that were applied to all locomotive operations.The North West of England quickly proved to be the area which offered the best of operations with the stiff gradients of Shap on the West Coast Main Line and the Long Drag of Ais Gill on the Settle and Carlisle route providing a challenge to the footplate crews, an experience for the passengers and a sight to see from the lineside.The lineside view has been captured by the author who lives within the area at Southport hence has been well placed to record many of these workings within the area and the wide variety of locomotive types whose owners have finally achieved the ambition of their locomotives joining the unique club of Steam Locomotives Working in the North West.

Plug-in Vehicles, Plugged in Policy?

Fourth Report of Session 2012-13

Plug-in Vehicles, Plugged in Policy?

Consumer demand for plug-in vehicles remains very low and the Government grant to encourage demand may not be proving effective. The Government must do more to show that its plug-in vehicle strategy is a good use of public money. Carbon emissions from transport must be reduced if the UK is to meet its climate change targets, but public money must be targeted on effective policies. So far, Department for Transport expenditure on plug-in cars - some £11 million - has benefited just a handful of motorists. There is a risk that the Government is basically subsidising second cars for affluent households. It is also unclear whether the provision of public charging infrastructure encourages demand for plug-in cars. Indeed, the Government does not even have a register of all the chargepoints installed at public expense

Images of England Through Popular Music

Class, Youth and Rock 'n' Roll, 1955-1976

Images of England Through Popular Music

Drawing on archival sources and oral testimony, Keith Gildart examines the ways in which popular music played an important role in reflecting and shaping social identities and working-class cultures and - through a focus on rock 'n' roll, rhythm & blues, punk, mod subculture, and glam rock - created a sense of crisis in English society.