Paperboy

Paperboy

*"Reminiscent of To Kill a Mockingbird." —Booklist, Starred "An unforgettable boy and his unforgettable story. I loved it!" —ROB BUYEA, author of Because of Mr. Terupt and Mr. Terupt Falls Again This Newbery Honor winner is perfect for fans of To Kill a Mockingbird, The King’s Speech, and The Help. A boy who stutters comes of age in the segregated South, during the summer that changes his life. Little Man throws the meanest fastball in town. But talking is a whole different ball game. He can barely say a word without stuttering—not even his own name. So when he takes over his best friend’s paper route for the month of July, he’s not exactly looking forward to interacting with the customers. But it’s the neighborhood junkman, a bully and thief, who stirs up real trouble in Little Man’s life. A Newbery Honor Award Winner An ALA-ALSC Notable Children’s Book An IRA Children’s and Young Adults’ Choice An IRA Teachers’ Choice A Bank Street College of Education Best Book of the Year A National Parenting Publications Award Honor Book A BookPage Best Children’s Book An ABC New Voices Pick A Junior Library Guild Selection An ALA-ALSC Notable Children’s Recording An ALA-YALSA Amazing Audiobook A Mississippi Magnolia State Award List Selection “[Vawter’s] characterization of Little Man feels deeply authentic, with . . . his fierce desire to be ‘somebody instead of just a kid who couldn’t talk right.’” —The Washington Post “Paperboy offers a penetrating look at both the mystery and the daily frustrations of stuttering. People of all ages will appreciate this positive and universal story.” —Jane Fraser, president of the Stuttering Foundation of America *“[A] tense, memorable story.” —Publishers Weekly, Starred “An engaging and heartfelt presentation that never whitewashes the difficult time and situation as Little Man comes of age.” —Kirkus Reviews “Vawter portrays a protagonist so true to a disability that one cannot help but empathize with the difficult world of a stutterer.” —School Library Journal

The Paperboy

The Paperboy

The sun is rising over Moat County, Florida, when Sheriff Thurmond Call is found dead on the highway, gutted like an alligator. A local redneck is swiftly arrested, tried and sentenced to death. Ward James - hotshot investigative reporter - returns to his rural hometown, intrigued by the proposition from a death row femme fatale who promises him the story of the decade. She's armed with explosive evidence, aiming to free her convicted 'fianc'. Together, they barrel down Florida's back roads and through its seamy underbelly in search of The Story, racing flat out into a head-on collision that will make headline news.

Paperboy

Paperboy

Christopher Fowler's memoir captures life in suburban London as it has rarely been seen: through the eyes of a lonely boy who spends his days between the library and the cinema, devouring novels, comics, cereal packets - anything that might reveal a story. Caught between an ever-sensible but exhausted mother and a DIY-obsessed father fighting his own demons, Christopher takes refuge in words. His parents try to understand their son's peculiar obsessions, but fast lose patience with him - and each other. The war of nerves escalates to include every member of the Fowler family, and something has to give, but does it mean that a boy must always give up his dreams for the tough lessons of real life? Beautifully written, this rich and astute evocation of a time and a place recalls a childhood at once entertainingly eccentric and endearingly ordinary.

The Paper Boy

The Paper Boy

Albert Sparks Jr. was born in 1929, the only child of Albert and Mamie Sparks. The Sparkses were good people, non-educated, and much influenced by the southern rural, fundamentalist Protestant Church. Two years later, in early Depression times, they built a small brick home in Bodenheimer, a community about 10 miles from Winston-Salem, NC. Albert Jr. was reared in that home-centered, church focused environment, and at age 10 he became a member of Royal Ambassadors, a boys organization at Bodenheimer Baptist. Still a member even now, his leader is a maudlin, highly emotional lady, a teary and true daughter of the Lord. And then, a fellow RA offered him the opportunity to become a paperboy. A new life began! Albert Jr. had a route of 65 Bodenheimer customers, more or less. Every afternoon on his rounds he heard stories...Calvin Butner and his bootlegging, hauling white likker in a Nehi drink truck; Hub and Estelle Doty and their marital problems, and their strange succession of partners. Some stories have follow-up chapters, such as the German POW who walked away from a work detail. A key to the stories is Wellman’s Store, where Albert Jr. meets the truck with his daily bundle of Tribunes. Every day he talks with Cece and Ella Mae Wellman about war news, and he hears gossip from the Ladies News Table. Most chapters have the date and a few headlines from that day’s paper. In the final chapter, on the night of V-J Day, he met “the prettiest girl I’ve ever seen”, 15 years old, and ‘so-o-o soft’. Actually, she’s the RA leader’s niece. And they celebrated V-J Night, or at least they started. “I prob’ly won’t go back to RA’s.”

Paperboy

Paperboy

"Paperboy" tells the story as only an afternoon paperboy in rural America in the sixties can. Thousands of readers identified with the unique characters of Colby while reading "The Bridge." They grew to love Tommy and the band of boys, were entertained by their childish pranks, and touched by their generosity. In "Paperboy," change is coming to Colby. The shoe factory has sold and a hat factory is taking its place. A factory manager has been named and he's definitely not from Colby. There's an influx of interesting newcomers. The high school principal is also new to Colby. He must deal with teenage pregnancy, the snooping high school office secretary, and the Colby Curls rumor mill. He, too, has a mysterious past and uses it to his advantage. The pregnant teen and her auto-mechanic single mother aren't Colby natives either. Rumors about both abound. The mother has a past which touches the present, and eventually involves the entire town. Tommy and Booger, while delivering the "Colby Telegraph," discover that Colby's patriarch, Mr. Koch, has a heroic but classified history. While raking leaves for Mrs. Whitener, they learn the origin of her accent and how she got to Colby. It's not what most people think. Jupiter Storm, the town's primary purveyor of gossip, whose opinion always exceeds his knowledge, is perpetually annoying. But Tommy and Booger learn that Jupiter is a decorated World War II veteran. And when a threatening stranger appears on the scene, the entire town learns of Jupiter's unique but redeeming skill. How will Colby be different, and how will it be the same? About the Author Stan and his wife Debbie live in Southern Missouri where they raised three boys and a golden retriever. www.stancrader.com

Jazz Kills the Paperboy

Jazz Kills the Paperboy


Paperboy

Paperboy

Paperboy is a journey through the salient moments of a young boy's life -- the fears, the trials, the tragedies and the small triumphs -- with each moment contemplated in terms of paper. Tissue paper that tears too readily, fly paper to which nasty things adhere, folded paper with which to create hope.

Paperboy

Confessions of a Future Engineer

Paperboy

Anyone wondering what sort of experience prepares one for a future as an engineer may be surprised to learn that it includes delivering newspapers. But as Henry Petroski recounts his youth in 1950s Queens, New York–a borough of handball games and inexplicably numbered streets–he winningly shows how his after-school job amounted to a prep course in practical engineering. Petroksi’s paper was The Long Island Press, whose headlines ran to COP SAVES OLD WOMAN FROM THUG and DiMAG SAYS BUMS CAN’T WIN SERIES. Folding it into a tube suitable for throwing was an exercise in post-Euclidean geometry. Maintaining a Schwinn revealed volumes about mechanics. Reading Paperboy, we also learn about the hazing rituals of its namesakes, the aesthetics of kitchen appliances, and the delicate art of penny-pitching. With gratifying reflections on these and other lessons of a bygone era–lessons about diligence, labor, and community-mindedness–Paperboy is a piece of Americana to cherish and reread. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Paperboy

The Paperboy

A paperboy and his dog enjoy the quiet of the early morning as they go about their rounds.

The Perk Paperboy

The Perk Paperboy

“I did not have time to read this, but once I started, I could not stop. I read until 11 p.m. and then woke up at 2:30 a.m. and finished at dawn, January 6, 2010. This account of life in a southern hamlet, just before the horrific experience of Vietnam ended America’s last era of innocence, would be of interest to any student of sociology. But in the case of this reader, its magnetism springs from the fact that I knew nearly everyone in the Perk Paperboy a decade later, having arrived in Perk as a history teacher in 1967. I was fascinated by the sketches of the younger Dean C.G. Odom, Sydney Alexander, Gregory Davis, Sadie Lee, and so many others. C.G. hired me. Miss Alexander’s office was on the same hall as mine in the Dees Building, and Mrs. Davis showed me the squared timbers in her home that were hand hewed circa 1859 by John Perkins who gave his name to “Perkins Town.” I saw Sadie Lee stick a screwdriver in an electrical socket and melt in a flash of sparkling blue fire that did no harm because it had a rubber handle. To me, reading this was like watching the first half of a movie I had already seen the ending of. I enjoyed it thoroughly.” —Charles Sullivan, author of Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College: A History “Len Blackwell has written a warm and loving account of growing up in Perkinston, Mississippi. Readers will perceive images of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn in the author’s adventures. It is a book for every family’s bookshelf to be read again and again.” —George Thatcher, author of Beach Walks The Paperboy: “It was my good fortune to be in a village that helped raise me, and it was a rare privilege in that special time of growing up to see it from the vantage point of my Western Flyer bicycle, delivering the news, a kid pedaling away with my hair blowing in the breeze.”