Railway Memories the Trials and the Triumph

A B.R. Motive Power Engineer's Experience of the Steam to Diesel Years

Railway Memories the Trials and the Triumph

An eye-opening illustrated review in words and pictures of the transition from steam to diesel during the 1950s and 60s as experienced by former British Rail locomotive engineer Tom Greaves, especially the sudden and chaotic changeover that took place on the suburban services out of King's Cross during 1959.

The Memory Chalet

The Memory Chalet

It might be thought the height of poor taste to ascribe good fortune to a healthy man with a young family struck down at the age of sixty by an incurable degenerative disorder from which he must shortly die. But there is more than one sort of luck. In 2008, historian Tony Judt learnt that he was suffering from a disease that would eventually trap his extraordinary mind in a declining and immobile body. At night, sleepless in his motionless state, he revisited the past in an effort to keep himself sane, and his dictated essays form a memoir unlike any you have read before. Each one charts some experience or remembrance of the past through the sieve of Tony Judt's prodigious mind. His youthful love of a particular London bus route evolves into a reflection on public civility and interwar urban planning. Memories of the 1968 student riots of Paris meander through the sexual politics of Europe, a series of roadtrips across America lead not just to an appreciation of American history, but to an eventual acquisition of citizenship. And everything is as simply and beautifully arranged as a Swiss chalet - a reassuring refuge deep in the mountains of memory.

Theatres of Memory

Past and Present in Contemporary Culture

Theatres of Memory

When Theatres of Memory was first published in 1994, it transformed the debate about what is to be considered history and questioned the role of “heritage” that lies at the heart of every Western nation’s obsession with the past. Today, in the age of Downton Abbey and Mad Men, we are once again conjuring historical fictions to make sense of our everyday lives. In this remarkable book, Samuel looks at the many different ways we use the “unofficial knowledge” of the past. Considering such varied areas as the fashion for “retrofitting,” the rise of family history, the joys of collecting old photographs, the allure of reenactment societies and televised adaptations of Dickens, Samuel transforms our understanding of the uses of history. He shows us that history is a living practice, something constantly being reassessed in the world around us.

Theatres of Memory: Past and present in contemporary culture

Theatres of Memory: Past and present in contemporary culture

This work offers an overview of how the past has been manipulated in art, politicized and sold to the consumer, yet takes issue with those who claim this interest in heritage is merely obsessive nostalgia. The author covers a multitude of topics, such as the Festival of Britain and conservation.

D for Diesels : 12

A Review of BR's Early Diesel Fleet

D for Diesels : 12


Barnsley and Beyond

Railway Memories

Barnsley and Beyond

A collection of memories of a bygone age of the railway system that operated around the Barnsley area and beyond. It was a time when steam was still king (the local passenger, expresses and freight traffic were worked by steam), however the advent of diesel, although not initially noticeable, was gradually taking place. Towards the end of the 1950s and throughout the 1960s, rationalization of the railway system and mass dieselization took place, culminating in the end of steam on British railways (with the exception of the running of the Flying Scotsman) in August 1968. Many of the previously unseen photographs in this book include those of Royston Shed's steam fleet during the last months of working, before closing to steam officially on 4 November 1967; Thompson B1s, ex-Great Central Directors and Royston 8Fs at Stairfoot; an ex-Midland engine hauling an express over Swaithe viaduct; Barnsley Court House station prior to closure in 1960 and the famous Flying Scotsman's visit to Barnsley on 21 June 1969.