British Rail Standard Diesels of the 1960s

British Rail Standard Diesels of the 1960s

In 2005, Ian Allan Publishing published Diesel Pioneers, which provided a complete overview of the development of the early diesel classes inherited by BR and those that were developed as part of the Modernisation Plan of 1955. This lovely new book takes the subject forward and covers the standard diesel locomotive designs that were made during the early 1960s which include the Class 33s, the 37s, the 47s, the Hymeks, the Westerns and the Deltics as well as the less successful Claytons. A number of these early classes proved successful and were built in significant numbers between their introduction and the ceasing of production in the late 1960s. Many of the most productive classes were, in fact, not to arise from the Modernisation Plan but were developed from the early 1960s onwards and this book covers these in detail. The book explores the background to the development of each class and provides an extended overview of diesel locomotive development of this period. Illustrated with unseen photographs, many with colour throughout, this book will appeal to the growing numbers of diesel modellers and enthusiasts.

British Steam BR Standard Locomotives

British Steam BR Standard Locomotives

After WWII the existing railway companies were all put into the control of the newly formed British Transport Commission and that government organization spawned British Railways, which came into being on 1st January 1948. The railway infrastructure had suffered badly during the war years and most of the steam locomotives were 'tired' and badly maintained and or life expired. Although the management of British Railways was already planning to replace steam power with diesel and electric engines/units they still took a decision to build more steam locomotives (as a stop gap). Some 999 (yes just 1 short) Standard locomotives were built in 12 classes ranging from super powerful express and freight engine to suburban tank locomotives. The locomotives were mainly in good order when the order came in 1968 to end steam, some only 8 years old.There still exists a fleet of 46 preserved Standards of which 75% are in working order in and around the UKs preserved railways, furthermore 3 new build standard locomotives are proposed. Steam fans who were around in the 1960s all remember the 'Standards'.

BR Diesel Locomotives in Preservation

BR Diesel Locomotives in Preservation

When British Railways (BR) initiated its Modernization Plan in 1954 it had little experience of diesel locomotives thus initiated a Pilot Scheme to trial combinations of the three elements comprised within a locomotive the engine, transmission and body.The initial orders for 174 locomotives were placed in November 1955, but even before the first locomotive had been delivered, changes in Government policy led to bulk orders for most designs being trailed. It was only in 1968, once steam traction had been removed from the network, that BR was able to review the success, or otherwise, of its diesel fleet and decide which designs to withdraw from service.The nascent preservation movement of the time was concerned to preserve steam locomotives whilst only buying diesel shunting locomotives for support roles on heritage lines and it wasnt until 1977 that any effort was made to preserve main line diesels. Once it was confirmed that diesel locomotives had an appeal to enthusiasts, further purchases were made that resulted in examples of most of the BR diesel classes being represented within the preservation movement.Fred Kerrs book details those classes which are represented on heritage lines, identifies where possible their location as of December 2016, shows many of them at work and shows what is involved in the restoration, maintenance and operation of diesel locomotives by the volunteers whose efforts are vital but rarely acknowledged.Some of the preserved locomotives were bought for possible use on the national network and this was facilitated by the Railways Bill 1993. A complementary album of preserved and heritage locomotives titled Heritage Traction on the Main Line details the locomotive classes whose representatives are still in regular use on the national network as at December 2016 and follows a similar format to this album.

British Steam: BR Standard Locomotives

British Steam: BR Standard Locomotives

After WWII the existing railway companies were all put into the control of the newly formed British Transport Commission and that government organization spawned British Railways, which came into being on 1st January 1948. The railway infrastructure had suffered badly during the war years and most of the steam locomotives were 'tired' and badly maintained and or life expired. Although the management of British Railways was already planning to replace steam power with diesel and electric engines/units they still took a decision to build more steam locomotives (as a stop gap). Some 999 (yes just 1 short) Standard locomotives were built in 12 classes ranging from super powerful express and freight engine to suburban tank locomotives. The locomotives were mainly in good order when the order came in 1968 to end steam, some only 8 years old.There still exists a fleet of 46 preserved Standards of which 75% are in working order in and around the UKs preserved railways, furthermore 3 new build standard locomotives are proposed. Steam fans who were around in the 1960s all remember the 'Standards'.

Heritage Traction on the Main Line

Heritage Traction on the Main Line

In an earlier album titled BR Diesel Locomotives in Preservation Fred Kerr detailed the many classes of BR diesel locomotives that had been preserved and noted that some purchases had been made with the hope of operating them on the national network.The Railways Bill 1993 provided an opportunity for this to happen and this album shows such locomotives at work during the early part of the 21st century up to December 2016. During this period many new train operators entered the market and their early operations used elderly locomotives withdrawn from service by their original operators until their business(es) were established and new locomotives could be bought. On occasion these new companies were prepared to hire preserved locomotives with main line access to service short-term contracts and these, mainly freight, services provided much of the variety of locomotive operations that offset the increasing sight of multiple unit train services that epitomize the modern railway.The author has chosen to consider heritage traction as any locomotive older than twenty years, which therefore includes electric locomotives but excludes those of that age which are still operated by their owners as at April 1 1994 when British Railways (BR) was privatized. This results in the Class 59 fleet being excluded because its ownership has been constant but the Class 60 fleet being included because of purchases by Colas Railfreight after that date.

British Steam Patriots

British Steam Patriots

The Patriot class, often referred to as 'Baby Scots', were an immediate success displaying consistently good performance. The class was withdrawn over a two year period between 1960 and 1962 having all covered around 1.3 million miles each, unfortunately too early to be considered for preservation. The last two withdrawn were in good condition on withdrawal, but unfortunately all were scrapped.Although no Patriot in either rebuilt or unrebuilt forms survived into preservation a new 'Patriot' is under construction at the Llangollen Railway. The LMS-Patriot Project, a registered charity, is appealing for donations or regular contributions to build the new, 3 cylinder, Fowler designed, parallel boiler, 4-6-0 express passenger loco.Although mostly new, the group will use the leading wheel sets from two LMS 8F locomotives. An unrestored surviving LMS Fowler tender from Woodham Brothers Barry scrap yard will also be used for the project. The new build Patriot is being assembled at the Llangollen Railway Works, and will carry the number of the last built - LMS number 5551 or British Railways number 45551. After a public poll, the new Patriot locomotive will be named The Unknown Warrior, whose tomb is located in Westminster Abbey.The new Royal British Legion backed engine will be launched in late 2011 or early 2012 and this is the only 'official' book of the project. Containing hundreds of new, never before published photographs, British Steam - Patriot will tell the story of the engine from its original concept, follow its production throughout the building period and also its launch.The book will be endorsed by the Royal British Legion and promoted to all its members. This will be a must for all railway enthusiasts.

British Railways Steam in the 1960s

British Railways Steam in the 1960s

250 period pictures depicting the final years of regular steam working on British Railways in the 1960s.

British Rail Main Line Locomotives Specification Guide

British Rail Main Line Locomotives Specification Guide

British Rail Main Line Locomotives Specification Guide identifies the major detail differences and livery variations that have appeared on all British Rail, ex-British Rail and privatized railway diesel and electric main line classes from 14 to 92. The book provides a record of the main specifications of each class of locomotive, and details of variations, including: numbers, liveries, headcodes, headlights, wheel arrangements and bogies, brakes, names and - where appropriate - details of refurbishment programmes.Diesel locomotives are a relative newcomer to the railway enthusiast and modelling scenes, and this book brings together information on detail changes in a coherent reference form for the first time, illustrated with photographs of major changes. A useful resource for modellers and those with an interest in the differences that have occurred to the British Rail fleet. Superbly illustrated with around 300 colour photographs.

GWR Collett Castle Class

GWR Collett Castle Class

The 'Castle' class 4-6-0 locomotives designed by Charles Collett and built at Swindon Works were the principal passenger locomotives of the Great Western Railway. The 4-cylinder locomotives were built in batches between 1923 and 1950, the later examples being constructed after nationalisation by British Railways. In total 171 engines of the class were built and they were originally to be seen at work all over the Great Western Railway network, and later working on the Western Region of British Railways. The highly successful class could be described as a GWR work in progress, because further development took place over almost all of the locomotives working lives. In addition to inspiring other locomotive designers the 'Castle' class engines were proved to be capable of outstanding performances, and when introduced were rightly described as being 'Britain's most powerful passenger locomotives'. Some of the 'Castles' survived in service for over 40 years, and individually clocked up just a little short of 2 million miles in traffic. In this book, Keith Langston provides a definitive chronological history of the iconic class together with archive photographic records of each GWR 'Castle' locomotive. Many of the 300 plus images are published for the first time. In addition background information on the origin of the names the engines carried, including details of the many name changes which took place, are also included. The extra anecdotal information adds a fascinating glimpse of social history. Collett CASTLE Class is a lavishly illustrated factual reference book which will delight steam railway enthusiasts in general and in particular those with a love of all things Great Western!

The Voyager Family

The Voyager Family

When British Railways was privatized in 1994, much interest was generated by the franchise arrangements, including the new operators and the specific requirements of the franchise agreements. The West Coast Main Line (WCML) was a major operation offered as two franchises covering Inter City and Cross-Country services, and both were initially won by Virgin Trains (albeit operated by separate companies within the Virgin group).The Inter City franchise was awarded to Virgin Trains West Coast (VTWC) and the Cross-Country franchise was awarded to Virgin Trains Cross Country (VTCC), but both franchise agreements were awarded on condition that the existing rolling stock was replaced. In the case of VTCC this meant replacing the mix of ageing locomotive-hauled train sets by a new fleet of diesel multiple unit train sets, leading to two designs being ordered in 1998 with deliveries beginning in 2001. The Class 220 Voyager was a 4-car train set specified for VTCCs Inter City services, whilst the Class 221 Super Voyager was a 5-car train set with tilting mechanism for Cross Country services; the Super Voyager order also included four 4-car train sets for operation on Euston Holyhead services.The new fleets quickly provided a standard fleet, but the Virgin Trains franchises soon became involved in political issues that affected both the running of the companies and the operation of the train sets, leading to the Cross Country franchise changing operators in 2006. At the same time, political interference in franchise agreements led to other franchisees being forced to make decisions regarding fleet renewals and train operation that led to variations to the original Voyager designs being introduced to service.The Voyager Family covers the earliest days of operation while reflecting the many changes that have taken place, both in the franchisees who have operated them and in their spheres of operation. Despite the many criticisms, the train sets continue to provide an extensive range of services, all of which are celebrated in this book.